Archive for PTO

Properly maintaining your John Deere Hydrostatic Tractor will help to ensure that it will last a very long time. Failure to keep up with the maintenance of any machine will only mean more mechanical issues down the road.

The first thing you will want to do is check the engine components, like the air intake system, fuel, lubrication and ignition systems.

1) Do a thorough clean of the air intake and engine.
2) Do a compression check.
3) Check the valve-to-tappet clearance while the engine is cold.
4) Make sure the cylinder heads are free from carbon and cleaned.
5) Check the break points and adjust as needed.
6) Check and adjust the timing.
7) Make sure the spark plug is clean and okay.
8) Adjust carburetor, then adjust it to the governor rod.
9) Check and adjust governor linkage.
10) Check the air cleaner.
11) Check engine oil pressure.
12) Adjust the PTO.
13) Change the oil and the oil filter.
14) Check the battery and battery connections.

john deere hydrostatic tractorThen to make sure the tractor will run optimally, do the following adjustments as needed.

1) Make sure the brakes are adjusted properly.
2) Check and change/refill transmission fluid as needed.
3) Lube grease fittings.
4) Adjust the hydrostatic linkage.
5) Test the hydraulic system.
6) Adjust steering as needed.
7) Make sure the wiring looks clean and is all connected properly.
8) Check all the belts and make sure all fittings are tightened as needed.
9) Make sure the tire pressure is correct.

Take care of your John Deere and it will take care of you and your property for years, maybe a lifetime!

The John Deere 110 Garden Tractor

The model 110 was John Deere’s first Lawn & Garden tractor. In 1962 a design was laid forth to build a lawn and garden tractor that would offer many of the same features and wide range of implements that the bigger John Deere tractors offered. It would offer small rural and urban landowners alike the chance to own an affordable Small Tractor with a Big Farmer feel. The new tractor was designated the John Deere Model 110 in keeping with the current Ten Series Waterloo and Dubuque tractors. Ergonomically designed, with new features way ahead of its time, its exclusive Variable Speed Drive allowed for high speed mowing and super low end tilling. Its stout, and dependable Cast Iron 7 hp K-161 Kohler engine gave the tractor plenty of power to utilize the integral worktools. It was a great design, and was quick to become a big seller with 1000 models built for 1963. Features included:

  • Seven horsepower, air cooled, Kohler model K161 cast iron engine with electric start 
  • Peerless three speed transmission with speed variator that allowed slowing the tractor without interrupting power to the driven equipment
  • Rear tires and drive belts enclosed and shielded for operator protection. A full hood and grille protecting the engine, battery, starter, etc.

  • Quick -Tach style mounting of attachments

  • Scratch resistant fiberglass hood and fenders 
  • Triple safe starting 

  • Heavily built frame and front axle to handle heavy loads.
  • Adjustable tread rear wheels, important for mowing on hillsides.

 

Introduced as a seven horse model in 1963, for 1964 an eight horse Kohler K181S was utilized and the fiberglass fenders were replaced with steel. For 1965 the transmission was changed from three speed to four speed, and in 1966 Hydraulic Lift was offered as a factory only option. In 1966 a new 110 with Manual Lift cost $719 and the standard 38″ deck was $148.

Triple safe starting was a feature from the start. The PTO needed to be disengaged, the transmission in neutral and the key used before the tractor could be started. This feature was advertised by showing children playing and climbing on the tractor. Deere considered the safety feature to be a key selling point on the tractors.

The most obvious design change was in 1968 when the separate “round fenders” were replaced by a one-piece “fender deck” that was rubber mounted to the frame. The next significant change occurred in 1972 with a larger, heavier frame, choice of the 8 hp Kohler K181S or a 10 hp Kohler K241S engine.  Electric lift became an option in 1973.

The model 110 initially weighed approximately 500# with the later versions adding weight to a total of 775#. The 110 was designed as a garden tractor and Deere offered many integral attachments to suit the homeowner, as well as the commercial user :

  • Model 20 Compressor
  • Model 38, 39 and 46 (for 10hp)  mower deck
  • Model 36, 37, and 37A snowthrowers
  • Model 30, 31, and 31A rear rotary tiller
  • Model 42 and 43 blade
  • Model 80 dump cart
  • Model 7, 5a, and 5b sprayer
  • Front and rear slab weights and rear wheel weights
  • Tire chains, hub caps, cigarette lighter, and headlights
  • An integral hitch
  • Tire equipment options

Serial number breaks are as follows:

Year Serial Number Engine
1963 2,550 – 3,550 Kohler K161 (7hp)
1964 3,551 – 15,000 Kohler K181 (8hp)
1965 15,001 – 40,000 Kohler K181
1966 40,001 – 65,000 Kohler K181
1967 65,001 – 100,000 Kohler K181
1968 100,001 – 130,000 Kohler K181
1969 130,001 – 160,000 Kohler K181
1970 160,000 – 185,000 Kohler K181
1971 185,001 – 250,000 Kohler K181
1972 250,001 – 260,000 Kohler K181
1972 260.001 – 272,000 Kohler K241 (10hp)
1973 272,001 – 285,000 Kohler K181
1973 285,001 – 310,000 Kohler K241
1974 310,001 – 320,000 Kohler K181
1974 320,001 – Kohler K241

 

 

The John Deere 112 Garden Tractor

The model 112 came out in 1966. After the successful sales of the Model 110, Deere realized they need a lager size mower for the larger size jobs. The 112 carried on the same sleek styling of the 110, but with a larger motor and of course, a wider deck.. The new model 112 had the following specifications:

  • Cast-iron Tecumseh HH100 ten hp engine.
  • 4speed transaxle with super low for tilling
  • Electric start,
  • Worm gear steering
  • Fiberglass hood
  • 1.9 gal fuel tank
  • Dry type air filter
  • Variable speed drive

 

The 112 is truly a farm-bred tractor. They bring time saving performance and convenience that owners expect form John Deere. They are designed for everyone to drive with a triple-safe starting system to prevent dangerous unexpected starts. The variable speed drive gives you complete control to match the tougher job conditions without sacrificing engine speed or working efficiency. Hydraulic Lift was a new option for the 1966 model year on the 110 and 112.

The 1966 112 had a base weight of 642 lbs, and carried a $830 price tag. A 12 with hyd lift weighed in at 663 lbs and was $938. The #46 deck was $150.

The 1968 model year showed a lot of new changes. The fenders and platform were combined into a 1 piece fender deck. An adjustable cushioned seat provided great comfort. Slanted footrests provided a place to rest the feet while mowing. Headlights were placed right above the grill just under the front lip of the hood. In 1969 another 10hp was an option. You could get a K241AS 10hp Kohler. Hyd lift was still an option.

1972 brought another hp change. A 12 hp K301AS Kohler was standard. Manual and Hyd lift were dropped and electric lift was the only lift option. An electric PTO clutch was standard 1972,73. In 1974 a manually engaged PTO replaced the electric clutch.

Year Serial Number Engine
1966 2,551 -3,550 Tecumseh HH100 (10hp)
1967 3,551 – 100,000 Tecumseh HH100
1968 100,001 – 130,000 Tecumseh HH100
1969 130,001 – 150,000 Tecumseh HH100
1969 150,001 – 160,000 Kohler K241 (10hp)
1970 160,001 – 180,000 Tecumseh HH100
1970 180,001 – 185,000 Kohler K241
1971 185,001 -225,000 Tecumseh HH100 (10hp)
1971 225,001 – 250,000 Kohler K241
1972 250,001 – 260,000 Kohler K301 (12hp)
1973 260,001 – 300,000 Kohler K301 (12hp)
1974 300,001 – Kohler K301 (12 hp)
Jul
09

PTO Shaft Geometry

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John Deere PTO ShaftPTO vibration is caused by the universal joints and is especially pronounced when cornering. The output velocity of a single U-joint operating at an angle fluctuates, even though the input velocity is constant. This output velocity fluctuation becomes greater as the angle of the U-joint is increased. To eliminate the velocity fluctuation and hence the PTO vibration, two universal joints are used. The velocity fluctuation caused by the first U-joint is cancelled by the second U-joint, only if both are operated at the same angle and are in phase with each other.

Since most tractor/implement PTO‘s use the two U-joint system, why may there still be PTO vibration? It is because the U-joints are not operating at the same angle. Most tractors with a 540 rpm PTO have a distance of 14 inches from the end of the tractor PTO shaft to the hitch point. Most implements, however, have a distance greater than 14 inches from the hitch point to the end of the implement input shaft. This design is necessary to allow sufficient telescoping action of the PTO shaft, so the shaft does not bottom out on sharp turns and does not allow the two parts of the PTO shaft to separate when the PTO is in line with the drawbar. This geometry however, does not allow the U-joints to operate at equal angles, when cornering.

Many implement manufacturers are supplying a tractor hitch extension with their implements. This extension increases the distance from the end of the tractor PTO shaft to the hitch point. The implement and PTO shaft are designed around this new geometry so the U-joints will operate at equal angles. This geometry is commonly called the EQUAL ANGLE HITCH. Existing equipment can be modified to obtain an equal angle hitch. For example, a 540 rpm PTO driven machine is hitched to a tractor. The distance from the end of the tractor PTO shaft to the hitch point is the standard 14 inches. The distance from the hitch point to the input shaft of the machine is measured and found to be 20 inches, making the overall distance 34 inches (14 and 20). For the PTO to operate at equal angles the hitch point should be 17 inches (34 divided by 2) from both the end of the tractor PTO and the input shaft of the machine.
A 3 inch extension is bolted to the tractor drawbar and the machine hitch is shortened 3 inches. It should be noted the overall distance of 34 inches has not changed and the original PTO shaft can still be used. However, the machine cannot be operated unless the drawbar extension is bolted to the tractor drawbar.

As mentioned earlier it is important to phase the U-joints correctly. Proper phasing of the U-joints allows the velocity fluctuation caused by the first U-joint to be cancelled by the second. Improper phasing compounds the velocity fluctuations and will cause severe vibration. The two parts of many PTO shafts are designed to fit together the correct way only.

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John Deere Compact TractorAfter months of looking and reading, more looking and more reading, I am starting to see what i really need to look at for size and capability of a compact tractor. These guys might be smaller than their agricultural brothers, but they carry a price tag that demands research.

Some of the questions you need to know the answers to.

How many acres of land will I be using my tractor on? Not only how large is my land, but also what type of land is it. Does it have a lot of hills, wet spots, thick woods, rocks? All of these things go into what type of tractor you might want. For example, Hilly terrain will call for a wider tractor with a low center of gravity.

What problem will be cause with a too small or too large of a tractor? I’m most cases, a smaller tractor can do most of what a larger one can, but it will take more time. As you get larger, you have to deal with a heavier and physically larger tractor that cannot get close to homes and trees as easily. Most on line tractor selectors will ask you how much lawn mowing or material you need to move in how much time. The more you have to do in less time, the larger the tractor. Be sure to think of all the tasks you want to do with this tractor because most people will size it correctly to mow grass, but not to till a garden, push snow, or move gravel.

What features or attachments will I need? Once you have a grip on the size tractor you need and you start to configure your tractor, don’t freak out! Ask for help with words that you don’t understand. Specific brands use different words that describe things most tractors have. They list electronic PTO clutch or Motion Match as benefits, but how do they benefit you? Look on the manufacturer’s website, or get involved in a forum where people can help you understand what these options do. Also try to size the implements you purchase to your tractor. John Deere does a good job of listing compatible implements with the tractors on their site. Be sure to think outside the box, especially if this is your first tractor. most people will find that they are very handy and will use them for way more than they expected.

What tires do I need? You can read for hours on this! From my reading, I have found that the R1 tires, or agricultural tires, have the most traction. They are normally narrower than the others and they can tear up areas that you drive one easily. R4 tires are called industrial and are wider than R1s but are made to be easier on grass and other soft materials. They also seem to be made to last longer due to their higher strength sidewall and thicker tread. These are the middle of the road tire. They seem to do a lot of things good, but nothing great. Lastly there is R3s, these are known as turf tires. Most people purchase these for lawn use only as they have little impact on grass. Most compact tractor users use R4s since they do a ton of different things and need a tire that they can mow the lawn with but still be able to work in the garden.

What conditions will I need to use my tractor in? Most of us home use people can decide when they need to use the tractor and can avoid rain and snow. Does your condition or financial position allow for a cab with heat or air conditioning? Different size tractors may come with cabs or you can get aftermarket cabs for the smaller ones.

Do I need 4WD? 4wd is critical if you want to use a loader on the front of the tractor. For basic mowing on relatively level ground, 4WD doesn’t really offer any advantages, and it may do even more damage to finished lawns than 2-wheel drive tractors. The only time 2wheel drive is clearly a better choice is when driving the tractor for long distances at road speeds. Performance and maintenance requirements are about the same in both options. In almost all cases, the bigger price tag of 4WD tractors is worth the investment. Tractors with 4WD will usually have substantially better resale values.

What Transmission? While manual transmissions used to be the standard for tractors, now the hydrostatic transmission, which allows clutch-free operation in a range of speeds, has become far more common than in years past. Hydrostatic transmissions are the best choice if the primary operators of the tractor aren’t familiar with using manual transmissions. However, they’re more expensive, and they reduce the available horsepower slightly when compared to manual transmissions. If your operators are comfortable with using a clutch, you can save some money and get a little more power out of your tractor by choosing a manual transmission. Depending on the work you do, a hydrostatic might be easier. The rule of thumb is that if your work is mostly in a straight ling, go with a gear machine. If you have turns and do a lot of forward and reverse, go hydro.

I hope this helps you to choose the proper tractor for your use. Do the research and stand by your decision, but mostly, enjoy doing every minute of it.

Categories : Compact Tractors
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