Archive for John Deere

JD 318 cut awayThe John Deere Lawn and Garden Tractors built from the 1960’s through the 1990’s have become very cool restoration projects for many enthusiasts.  Not only were they well built machines, they also performed very well.  Some are still looked at as some of the best performing lawn and garden tractors John Deere ever built.  The round fender John Deere 110’s are becoming very hard to find and the prices on these units, in any condition, has rose significantly over the past few years.  As enthusiasts, we hope this trend of restoration continues and we would like to do anything we can to help people with finishing a collection of material or information on these projects.

The following links are all PDF files.  We hope that they will help complete your collection or allow you a view of the Lawn and garden tractors of the time.  Some of the files are 30 to 40 meg and are full color.

 

1963_John Deere 110 Flier

1964 John Deere 110 Brochure

Weekend Freedom Machines 110 (A-1703-66-1)

1968 John Deere Lawn & Garden Tractors

1975 Full John Deere Lawn & Garden Tractor Brochure

1975 John Deere Attachment Literature

1979 Full Line of John Deere Lawn & Garden Tractors

1980 John Deere Lawn Tractors & Rear Engine Riders

1982 John Deere GT Brochure

1982 John Deere Accessories

1985 John Deere Lawn Tractors & Rear Engine Riders

1986 John Deere Lawn & Garden Tractors

1987 John Deere 100 Series Lawn Tractors

1990’s John Deere GT 300 & 400

Also, back in the day, when you purchased a new John Deere lawn and/or garden tractor, i.e. a 110 or a 140,  from your John Deere Dealer,  they also offered you a Snowco trailer to tow it home.  Today, these trailers are worth a lot of money and are very scarce.  If you find one in good condition, buy it! Here is a brochure from October 1968.

Snowco Trailer Brochure

If anyone has any other literature they would like to add, we would like to post it up here and share it.

We also encourage you to visit Green Tractor Talk as they are a John Deere only forum full of people who live and breathe John Deere.

 

 

Jul
10

Mower Deck Maintenance

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John Deere mower deckOver the past several years lawnmower manufacturers have been changing the design of the lawnmower deck and how it functions. Originally the decks were designed to rest on the ground with its gauge wheels supporting it. This allows the ground to completely control the contour and height of the cut directly related to the deck. The new designs now suspend the deck from the tractor with the gauge wheels set at about a quarter inch above the ground when the blades are set to the proper cutting height. The difference here is the tractor wheels now control the contour and height of cut. The gauge wheels only prevent scalping of uneven ground. I myself really prefer the new designs as I feel a much better finished result is achieved.
Now let us focus in on the deck maintenance. The majority of the deck maintenance is the same regardless of the mounting design. For example, cleaning, lubrication, blade sharpening, bearing and belt inspection and replacement are all the same as before. And basically, so is gauge wheel inspection and maintenance. The gauge wheels should need replacing less often without the deck being supported by them less often.
OK, now on to the major difference of these two designs. I was wondering if anyone else heeds the advice of their operator’s manual for their mower deck. I currently own a 62C and 72 John Deere mower decks. The 62C is mounted on a 2305 John Deere tractor and the 72 is mounted on a 2520 John Deere tractor. Both of my owner’s manuals have detailed procedures for leveling the mower deck front to back and side to side. I just did a recheck on mine and they were both in need of adjustment. The 62C needed the front to back tweaked and the 72 needed the side to side. I cannot recommend more highly the use of the leveling gauge sold by John Deere. What a great inexpensive tool. It really makes the job go so much more smoothly. Incidentally, I did check the level of both decks as delivered straight from the dealer when new and found that they did require some slight adjusting at that time as well. I am thinking that a level check is only needed every couple of years, or unless there is sufficient reason to do so sooner.
I find that doing my maintenance in the fall after the mowing season is finished works the best for me. I clean, inspect, and fix all that needs attention. I also sharpen and balance the blades at this time. Then come spring, all I have to do is mount the decks and mow. I do however check my level at this point rather than the fall. Having well maintained and leveled mower decks really yields premium results in a well groomed lawn.

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Changing Oil in Your John DeereThere seems to be more and more first time owners of sub-compact and compact tractor owners. I too joined this ever growing group back in 2008 when I first purchased my 2520 John Deere with a 72 inch mower deck and 60 inch brush. And then, not to long after the front end loader, a must have if you own one of these machines. A lot of learning now faced me as I started to use my machine. You know, 4wd, differential lock, power steering, 3 point hitch, and not to mention all the cool hydraulics. It does seem like a daunting task but, just take one step at a time, master it, and then move on to the next. And before you know it you’ll know what every lever and foot pedal does.

If you again are like me, then you will be doing your own maintenance on your pride and joy. There is no better way to really know your tractor than to do your own maintenance. And as I already stated, there are some completely new systems on these machines. For example, all new to me is the hydraulics, not so much the hydrostatic drive, but the increased complexity and all the auxiliary options. Then there is the added fact these machines are diesel, which again, is all new to me, and lest we forget, a cooling system and 4wd to learn and take care of. This is just the maintenance to deal with just the tractor alone. Along with it come all the attachments that require their own understanding and maintenance. But, that is completely another topic.

Once you thoroughly learn all about your tractor you are ready to test your knowledge and put it to use. Suddenly you are finding tasks using your new powerful machine to do things you never dreamed of before. And the ones you did know of have become so easy and pleasant they are not enough to feed your desire to spend more time in its seat. Moving mulch, mowing the lawn, grading the lane, and re-contouring the landscape is actually become tasks that you are looking forward to doing. And now suddenly you have noticed that the hour meter is hitting that precious 50 hour mark. Why is the 50 hour mark so important? It is where John Deere recommends that the oils and filters be changed.

As big a company as John Deere is I must give them credit in that they really do a pretty good job with their owner’s manuals. Now mind you, the still make a few mistakes here and there, but on the overall they are pretty good. I know that from tractor to tractor some of the maintenance intervals very. But, my point being that the owner manual won’t let you down. So just follow it step for step and you will make for some happy tractor time. And if that still isn’t good enough, just come and join us at GreenTractorTalk.com.

John Deere Lawn & GardenHere are the charts showing John Deere Lawn & Garden Tractor models by year and serial number.  The charts are broken up by decades, i.e. one chart for the 1960s, one chart for the 1970s, etc.  If you are searching for parts, this can be very helpful.

 

1960-1969 Equipment

1970-1979 Equipment

1980-1989 Equipment

1990-1999 Equipment

2000-2011 Equipment

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John Deere Parts is a comprehensive parts lookup and database covering all John Deere tractors, equipment and implements going back to 1975. This system is the same internet site used at the parts counter at the dealerships. The system allows you to look up parts by model numbers, part numbers or partial part numbers. It is found on John Deere’s website under parts at JDParts .

In order to use JDParts you are required to signup using a username and password. This is to ensure your privacy and security of your orders and personal information. After registering and you have located your item, just add it to the “Shopping Cart”. Now you can get a price, see inventory, or even order it directly through your specified dealership for easy pickup. You may change your designated dealership at any time should it be required or needed. For example, you can change to another local dealer to view their inventory on a specific item and then change back to your regular dealer. You can also find what equipment a part is used on as a part can cross over several models. Once you are approved to use the system it is highly recommended to take the time to get comfortable getting around in the system as there is a huge amount of information to sift through. The “Help” section contains all of the detailed information on using JDParts such as, Frequently Asked Questions, Learn to use JDParts, Finding Parts, Using the Shopping Cart and Ordering Parts, Doing Business with your Dealer, and Updating your Profile.

JDParts is not just a part locator; it includes maintenance items such as oils, filters, coolant, greases, batteries and home maintenance kits. To which you can also order through the JDParts system. The system also contains some equipment accessories and data sheets of chemicals, oils, and greases.

This information is most easily obtained by the “Key Word” search function. Probably the most useful and powerful feature of the system is it displays the parts list breakdown of every machine subassembly along with any available options. But, the big bonus is the detailed exploded diagrams. You can locate and see exactly how the part fits into the assembly to aid you in maintenance and repair of your equipment.

Now let’s discuss what the system can not do. You cannot source or price what John Deere defines as “Whole Goods” through this parts system since these are not parts, but rather whole options or accessories like a Mid Mount Mower or Front End Loader for example. These items will have to be priced and sourced through the sales department at a local or online dealer. You may however obtain a list price of a “Whole Goods” item through the “Build Your Own” function in another section of the John Deere website. You also can not buy directly from the website; all sales are completed through an authorized dealership specified by you.

Here is a PDF showing you how to use JD Parts

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