Archive for Deere

Jun
02

Deere Tractor Help Tips

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Many tractor owners fail to realize that properly inflating their tires can almost double their life. Tractor tires are costly and failure to properly maintain them will lead to costly repairs and replacements. Not to mention that at the current price of nearly $800 a tire, you’re just throwing money down the drain if you don’t. Also poorly inflated tires will produce a rougher ride and poor performance. Here are some helpful tips on how to gauge how your tractor tires are doing and how to better maintain them.

1) When you have too much air casing flexing decreases. This causes a rough ride.

2) When a tractor tire has too little air the casing stresses and the tire will wear out much faster.

3) Follow the dealer specs rather than guessing. Operational manuals are a life saver. Never think you know everything. Make sure you read the manual front to back, getting to know all of the ins and outs of the Deere tractor you own. If you follow dealer specs, you will not fail. They have done the studies and tests; they know what’s best for that model.

4) After you understand the recommended pressure of your tires, checking them before each operation takes only minutes. Some owners check their tires once a month, that’s just not enough.

5) Know what terrain you’re on. Each farm/property will vary; heat and terrain can affect wear and performance. Also, be careful how often you’re driving on asphalt. It can greatly negatively affect your tires.

Other tips:

* Look for cracks and unusual wear/damage on the tires.
* Use a calibrated tire gauge. Not all gauges are the same.
* Ballast the tractor every time you change an implement.
* In radial tires, never use fluid for weight, the sidewall will not flex properly.

The best thing you can do is to be over cautious. Know your tires, know your ride and you won’t go wrong.

Apr
04

Must Have John Deere Add-Ons and Parts

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Owning a Deere is great. Deere owners tend to love their tractors and some keep them a lifetime. However, not all tractors are alike, to get the most out of your tractor, here are some ‘must have’ add-ons.

Tractor hooks1) Bolt or weld on hooks will revolutionize your loader. Let’s face it; the most used implement on a tractor tends to be the loader. It’s fairly versatile and rarely gets taken off most tractors. The hooks make the bucket a much better tool when you find out how much more you can do with ease on your property. They add an entirely new scope of use to your tractor. Lifting odd objects like large trees trunks, logs or pulling items out of the ground becomes a whole lot easier with the hooks on your rig.

Products there include 5/16″ and 3/8″ Grab Hooks, Weldable Clevis/Shackle Mountings and D-Rings. Check out their website for more information, testing proof, videos and more. http://www.BoltOnHooks.com/

pallet forks2) Pallet forks are not just for use in a warehouse setting. On the farm or on your property, they can be a valuable work tool. Hauling large loads like logs, large stacks of feed, large hay bales and more are less of a problem.

One key when looking for the right pallet fork attachment is versatility and quality. Buy from a reputable dealer. Make sure the pallet forks you purchase fit properly. If they don’t fit right, then you may cause damage to the tractor over time. Check out Artillian, not only are their attachments quality, their customer service is perfect! http://www.Artillian.com/JDQAPalletForkSets.htm

3) Sometimes genuine John Deere parts can actually make a difference in your tractors performance. Knowing they fit and come from the manufacture can give you peace of mind. Also, there are some reproduction parts that are not made nor do they fit as they should. Check out http://www.GreenFarmParts.com/ to see their selection.

Buying the right gear for your Deere will help you get the most out of it. Just make sure you buy the add-ons and parts from the right dealers.

Categories : Compact Tractors
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 Model 300, 312, 316

 

Capable of using many of the same attachments as the JD 140, the 300 series of John Deere garden tractors began production with the 1975 model year. In that year, the hydrostatic model 300 was introduced, replacing the John Deere 140 and its seven-year production run. Although it shared many components from the 140, the 300 was upgraded to a 16HP Kohler K-series engine and had numerous styling changes. Major changes included a more squared off hood with integral headlights, engine side panels and a black plastic instrument panel. Realizing the liability of mounting a metal gas tank under the hood next to the battery, the model 300 had a plastic gas tank relocated under the rear fender pan with an increased capacity of 4.5 gallons. The John Deere 300 came equipped standard with a two-spool hydraulic lift system, a departure from the single or three-spool system available on the model 140. The charge pump and differential were largely unchanged from the 140, with the charge pump being manufactured by Sundstrand and the differential assembly by Dana. Individual rear wheel brakes also came standard on the model 300. Notably absent on the left side of the tractor was the clutch disconnect/ neutral return pedal found on the model 140. Identical to the model 300, the model 316 (Kohler powered) was manufactured during 1978 only. This particular model is often confused with the later series model 316, which was produced from 1984-1992. Being distinctly different tractors, there are few similarities between the early and late versions of the model 316. Manufactured briefly from 1977 to 1978, the model 312 provided a basic, no frills 300 series tractor with 12 HP Kohler engine, no engine side panels, no ammeter, H1 hydraulics, narrower rear tires, and a single brake pedal for both rear wheels. Headlights were an option on the 312.

Model 300 (Kohler 16 HP K341AQS)

Model 312 (Kohler 12HP K301AS)

 

Year Serial Number

1975

30,001 – 55,000
1976 55,001 – 70,000
1977 70,001 – 80,000

 

 

Year                                 Serial Number
1977 70,001 – 80,000
1978 80,001 – 95,000

 

Model 316 (Kohler 16 HP K341AQS)

 

 

Year             Serial Number1978            80,001 – 95,000

 

 

Model 314, 317

In 1979 John Deere began manufacturing models 314 and 317, respectively. Very much the same as previous hydrostatic models, the 314 and 317 represented the “basic” and “deluxe” versions of the 300 series hydrostatic tractors from 1979 until the 1983-1984 time period. One design change that is readily apparent was relocating much of the steering gear to the left side of the chassis. The 314 was an upgraded version of the 312 that reintroduced engine side panels on the “basic” tractor, increased horsepower to a 14HP Kohler engine, and standard installation of the wider 23×10.50×12 rear tires.

The 317 was John Deere’s first attempt at introducing a twin-cylinder engine into the 300 series tractor. A horizontally opposed Kohler KT17QS engine producing 17 horsepower was mated to a 300 series frame, resulting in the model 317. Offered as standard equipment on the 317 were headlights & taillights, ammeter, dual-spool hydraulics and individual rear wheel brakes.

It is no secret that the 317 has had its share of engine problems. Many of the model 317 tractors suffered catastrophic engine failure as a result of poor lubrication to the connecting rod journals of the crankshaft. The engine utilized a “Pressure spray” lubrication system, which operated at approximately 5 PSI and did not provide pressurized oil to the connecting rod journals. Instead, the connecting rod journals were lubricated with oil sprayed down from the camshaft. This resulted in inadequate lubrication, particularly if the tractor was operated on a side-hill incline. Kohler did not offer an immediate solution to this problem, and as an interim solution John Deere engineered a retrofit kit that would allow an Onan p218G to be installed into the 317 chassis.

Eventually Kohler did rectify the problematic KT17 engine by redesigning the engine with a full pressure lubrication system. Known as the KT17 Series II, the engine operated at a significantly higher oil pressure of 25-50 PSI. Kohler also cross-drilled the crankshaft, which allowed oil to be supplied under pressure to the connecting rod journals. The result was a much more durable engine with significantly longer life. A KT17 Series II engine can be identified by a specification (Spec.) number of 24300 or higher. Well into its last year of production, 1982, the 317 came equipped with a Kohler KT17 Series II engine as standard equipment from the factory. Unfortunately the reputation of the 317 and the original KT17 engine was well established by this point.

Model 314 Kohler 14HP K321AQS Model 317 Kohler KT17 QS

 

Year                      Serial Number
1979 95,001 – 120,000
1980 120,001 – 155,000
1981 155,001 – 190,000
1982 190,001 – 222,000
1983 222,001 – 285,000

 

 

Year                          Serial Number
1979 95,001 – 120,000
1980 120,001 – 155,000
1981 155,001 – 190,000
1982 190,001 – 222,000
1983 222,001 – 285,000

 

Model 316, 318, 330, 322, & 332

Starting with the model 318 in the 1983 model year, John Deere completely redesigned the 300 series. It was as revolutionary as the 140 had been when it was introduced. From a clean sheet of paper came the model 316 and 318, respectively. Once again all of the attachments that could be used on the previous 140 and 300 series tractors could be adapted to the new 318. New design features included:

  • Two-cylinder Onan air cooled engine with cast iron cylinder liners standard on both tractors.
  • Rear of frame redesigned to an “Open Frame” configuration, as opposed to “closed frame” design of previous 300 series tractors.
  • First use of annunciator lights incorporated into dash panel of 300 series tractors. Electromagnetic clutch for both front and rear PTO.
  • Redesigned fender deck resulting in a more “squared off” appearance resulting in greater operator protection and comfort.
  • Redesigned front axle to allow more weight bearing capacity. Replaceable spindle bushings.
  • Transaxle manufactured by Tecumseh, with a Hydraulic oil cooler as standard on the 318
  • True hydrostatic power steering. A first on a Lawn and Garden tractor.
  • A reserve fuel tank that allowed 15-30 minutes extra operating time.
  • Two spools of remote hydraulics

The 318 was truly a revolution in the Garden Tractor industry. And it needed to be. After the public relations disaster that Deere endured over the 317, Deere had gone back to the drawing board and went above and beyond anything the competition had. Operator comfort had been dramatically increased through the used of hydrostatic power steering. With a tight turning radius on 26 inches, the 318 turned inside many on the previous models.

The 18 horsepower Onan engine was powerful, and had tremendous lugging ability. The twin cylinder design was smooth and the engine was rubber mounted to further enhance operator comfort. As stated earlier, all of the current worktools in the Deere stable that fit previous models, could be used on the 318. In addition to those, a new two stage snow blower was added, as well as a Deere designed front broom.

With a change in the rear frame design, a whole new set of rear attachments was introduced. A rockshaft mounted three point hitch and 2000 RPM rear PTO controlled these attachments.

  • 48 inch rear pto driven tiller
  • 30 inch hydraulic tiller
  • 50 and 60 inch rear mounted grooming decks
  • Rear pto driven Material Collection Systems, one with hydraulic dumping
  • Also the #44 front mounted loader.

In 1984, the 318 was joined by its little brother the 316. Basically the same tractor as the 318, but without power steering and having only 1 spool of hydraulics. In 1986 the 330 joined the team, Deere’s first diesel powered Lawn and Garden tractor. And in 1988, the 330 was replaced by the 332, a diesel and the 322 was added with a 3 cylinder gasoline engine. The 330, 332, and 322 were all liquid cooled and the engines were sourced from Yanmar, the supplier of John Deere’s compact tractor line since 1979.

During the reign of the 318, Deere produced its 1 millionth Lawn and Garden tractor, and the 318 outsold any of the other models. It remains a very sought after tractor, with resale values remaining very high.

Model 318 Onan

 

1983 222,001 – 285,000
1984 285,001 – 315,000
1985 315,001 – 360,000
1986 360,001 – 420,000
1987 420,001 – 475,000
1988 475,001 – 595,000
1989 595,001 – 999,000
1990 010,001 – 100,000
1991 100,001 – 110,000
1992 110,001 – 120,000

 

John Deere 2520Here is a topic I have seen some complaining about on other sites; MMM (mid mount mower) independent lifts on the 2000 series machines. The complaint is “My deck won’t stay up unless I keep bumping the up lever”.

Let’s explore the reason you would actually need the independent lift option. The original intent of the design is to use the standard “mechanical lift”. This mechanism is power slaved off the 3pt hitch and does exactly the same thing as the independent lift “it raises the deck” so that you can set the proper cutting height or lock it in the full up position. Now, there may be an application where you want use the 3pt hitch function yet control the deck lift separately. I have just the example. In the fall I attach a trailer vacuum to my 2305’s 3pt hitch that is fed directly from the deck. Well I don’t want the blower and trailer hitch going up and down when I raise and lower the deck. So I added an independent lift to the 2305 and now can raise and lower the deck separately while leaving the 3pt in the full up position. It works great.

There are a couple of issues here that need clarifying.

First off, hydraulic cylinders are not designed to hold applying forces for extended periods of time. The piston seals are not capable of not leaking. In a hydraulic cylinder the seal will always have some kind of leakage or seepage. And with use will get worse and eventually get to the point it will need replacing. Just read the numerous threads out there complaining about their loaders leaking down. The MMM lifts are the same way. To expect the cylinder to hold the deck up for extended lengths of time is unreasonable. Now don’t get me wrong, there are things that Deere can design in to make this happen. The problem is it is not cost effective or practical. The point is the cylinder does exactly as designed; it lifts the deck so that it can be set to the proper height.

Secondly, on the 2305 and the 2320 Deere has designed a very nice device right into the platform of the tractor for controlling the deck cutting height and locking it in the full up position. The 2520 and 2720 have add-on options to set cutting height and full up lock out. When used properly the items work flawlessly. So, enjoy your tractor and always think safety.

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